a girl. her bike. and food.

biking away the pounds

I’m somewhat intrigued. what about you guys - yay? nay?

kind of really want this. it’d be perfect for traveling.

kind of really want this. it’d be perfect for traveling.

asked one of my closest friends if anyone in our group of friends had ever mentioned my weight gain.

she said no, and that she didn’t think anyone had even noticed.

while I’m sure she meant this to be a good thing, the first thing that went through my head is “I must not have ever been thin enough (read: sick enough) if they don’t know that I’ve gained weight”

but another part of me was just glad they didn’t think I was fat.

excuse me while I go eat some ice cream.

my road bike is out of commission for the next week or two.

instead of finding other ways to exercise while it’s broken, I did what any rational human being would do. I bought a mountain bike.

so far it’s seen a lot of road action, but I’ll get to the trails eventually.

I know this is horrible for me to say, but sometimes I secretly wish I would get injured so I would have an excuse to take a break from biking and exercise in general. the only way I could ever justify taking time off is if someone is making me.

but then again, what would I do with all my time if I wasn’t procrastinating my workout? Heaven forbid I actually get errands done, go to bed at a reasonable hour, or wear real clothes instead of workout clothes.

one week away from home + being trapped in close quarters with my family = lots of junk food, forced meals out, and coming home to a less than ideal number on the scale.

just when I think I can’t gain any more weight, I do.

*oy* time to suck it up and put some good miles on my bike this coming week.

side note and possible tmi - I think 50% of my weight gain in the past year has gone straight to my chest (slight exaggeration). but really. they’ve grown like 5 cup sizes (what looked like an AA to what feels like a DD, although I know they aren’t anywhere near that big). can’t decide if that’s good or bad.

the parents decided we’re going on a family vacation.

I should be excited.

instead I’m dreading it. I’m terrified.

they don’t know I still have (or ever had) food issues.

and I’m concerned about how I’ll exercise. running isn’t fun now that I weigh 40 lbs more.

I wish I could bring my bike. (I know I could - but it’s not worth the price or hassle of disassembling and reassembling it for the plane)

save me.

beccasfitlife:

ripthatbody:

Funny that I should find this recipe when I was just about to post it! ;) 
Guilt-free Peanut Butter Cookies!!!!! =D
Ingredients: 
1 Cup Natural Peanutbutter (or sunflower butter if you are allergic like moi! Haha)
3/4 Cup Stevia
2 Egg Whites
Protein Powder (optional)
Cinnamon (optional)For the directions [Click Here] 

OMG YES

beccasfitlife:

ripthatbody:

Funny that I should find this recipe when I was just about to post it! ;) 

Guilt-free Peanut Butter Cookies!!!!! =D

Ingredients: 

1 Cup Natural Peanutbutter (or sunflower butter if you are allergic like moi! Haha)

3/4 Cup Stevia

2 Egg Whites

Protein Powder (optional)

Cinnamon (optional)

For the directions [Click Here] 

OMG YES

(via liftingbiobabe)

brave girl eating

Brave Girl Eating by Harriot Brown

everyone should read this book. especially if you know someone who has/had an eating disorder.

"This is the story of how my older daughter, Kitty, became anorexic and nearly died, and how my husband, my younger daughter, and I helped her recover. This is not a story about family dysfunction, sexual abuse, or a poor little rich girl dying for attention. It’s not a cautionary tale about skinny fashion models and the media. It’s a story about an ordinary teenage girl who fell down the rabbit hole of anorexia—by accident, as it always happens—and about her slow, painful, infinitely courageous climb back up to health and hope, moment by moment, ounce by ounce, one spoonful at a time." (source)

"Millions of families are affected by eating disorders, which usually strike young women between the ages of fourteen and twenty. But current medical practice ties these families’ hands when it comes to helping their children recover. Conventional medical wisdom dictates separating the patient from the family and insists that "it’s not about the food," even as a family watches a child waste away before their eyes. Harriet Brown shows how counterproductive—and heartbreaking—this approach is by telling her daughter’s story of anorexia. She describes how her family, with the support of an open-minded pediatrician and a therapist, helped her daughter recover using family-based treatment, also known as the Maudsley approach." (source)

to learn more about the book/read an excerpt, click on any of the links or the picture above.

please, read it.